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WHAT FAMOUS PEOPLE SAY ABOUT ISLAM

Here we furnish some observations on Islam by acknowledged non-Muslim scholars of modern time. Truth needs no advocates to plead on its behalf, but the prolonged malicious propaganda against Islam has created great confusion even in the minds of free and objective thinkers.

We hope that the following observations would contribute to initiating an objective evaluation of Islam:

 

Canon Taylor, Paper read before the Church Congress at Walverhamton, Oct. 7, 1887, Quoted by Arnond in The Preaching of Islam, pp. 71-72:

It (Islam) replaced monkishness by manliness.  It gives hope to the slave, brotherhood to mankind, and recognition of the fundamental facts of human nature.

Sarojini Naidu, Lectures on “The Ideals of Islam”, see Speeches and Writings of Sarojini Naidu, Madras, 1918, p. 167:

Sense of justice is one of the most wonderful ideals of Islam, because as I read in the Quran I find those dynamic principles of life, not mystic but practical ethics for the daily conduct of life suited to the whole world.

 

G.B. Shaw, The Genuine Islam, Vol. 1, No. 81936:

I have always held the religion of Muhammad in high estimation because of its wonderful vitality.  It is the only religion which appears to me to possess that assimilating capacity to the changing phase of existence which can make itself appeal to every age.  I have studied him the wonderful man and in my opinion far from being an anti-Christ, he must be called the Savior of Humanity.  I believe that if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring it the much needed peace and happiness: I have prophesied about the faith of Muhammad that it would be acceptable to the Europe of tomorrow as it is beginning to be acceptable to the Europe of today.

 

Michael H. Hart, The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History, New York: Hart Publishing Company, Inc. 1978, p. 33:

My choice of Muhammad to lead the list of the worlds most influential persons may surprise some readers and may be questioned by others, but he was the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular level.

 

George Bernard Shaw said about the Prophet Muhammad:

He must be called the Saviour of Humanity.  I believe that if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring it much needed peace and happiness.

 

Mahatma Gandhi, speaking on the character of Muhammad, says in (Young India):

I wanted to know the best of one who holds todays undisputed sway over the hearts of millions of mankind….I became more than convinced that it was not the sword that won a place for Islam in those days in the scheme of life.  It was the rigid simplicity, the utter self-effacement of the Prophet, the scrupulous regard for his pledges, his intense devotion to this friends and followers, his intrepidity, his fearlessness, his absolute trust in God and in his own mission.  These and not the sword carried everything before them and surmounted every obstacle.  When I closed the 2nd volume (of the Prophets biography), I was sorry there was not more for me to read of the great life.

 

Maurice Bucaille, The Quran and Modern Science, 19812, p. 18:

A totally objective examination of it [the Quran] in the light of modern knowledge, leads us to recognize the agreement between the two, as has been already noted on repeated occasions, It makes us deem it quite unthinkable for a man of Mohammeds time to have been the author of such statements on account of the state of knowledge in his day. Such considerations are part of what gives the Quranic Revelation its unique place, and forces the impartial scientist to admit his inability to provide an explanation which call solely upon materialistic reasoning.

 

Arthur J.  Arberry, The Koran Interpreted, London: Oxford University Press, 1964, p.  x:

In making the present attempt to improve on the performance of my predecessors, and to produce something which might be accepted as echoing however faintly the sublime rhetoric of the Arabic Koran, I have been at pain to study the intricate and richly varied rhythms which apart from the message itself constitute the Korans undeniable claim to rank amongst the greatest literary masterpieces of mankind.  This very characteristic feature that inimitable symphony, as the believing Pickthall described his Holy Book, the very sounds of which move men to tears and ecstasy has been almost totally ignored by previous translators; it is therefore not surprising that what they have wrought sounds dull and flat indeed in comparison with the splendidly decorated original.

 

 

Malcolm X in his letter to his assistants in Harlem said:

“Never have I witnessed such sincere hospitality and overwhelming spirit of true brotherhood as is practiced by people of all colors and races here in this ancient Holy Land, the home of Abraham, Muhammad and all the other Prophets of the Holy Scriptures. For the past week, I have been utterly speechless and spellbound by the graciousness I see displayed all around me by people of all colors.

Prince Charles said:

‘Islam can teach us today a way of understanding and living in the world which Christianity itself is poorer for having lost. Islam refuses to separate man and nature, religion and science, mind and matter.’